Title:

A Note on the Family of the Reverend Edward Sparkes, Vicar of Clodock 1774-1813

Date:

1700s – 1800s

 

EdwardSparkes was vicar of Clodock from 1774 until his death in 1813.
 Genealogical research by David Robins on the Reverend Sparkes and his family
 is reproduced here with the author’s kind permission.

 

A Note on the Family ofthe Reverend Edward Sparkes

 


Nathaniel Winchcombe (1725[1]-1766[2]),a wealthy mercer from Frampton-on-Severn, Gloucestershire[3]married, 7th June 1756[4], AnnBell, ultimately the heiress to the Frampton Court estate.  She died 7thAugust 1757[5],leaving a son, Nathaniel Winchcombe II (1757[6]-1817[7]),who inherited the family fortune and succeeded to Frampton Court, assuming thename and arms of Clifford by Royal Licence in 1801[8]. His descendant, Rollo Clifford, is the present owner.

Nathaniel I re-married, atDursley, Glos. 19th June 1759[9] [10],as her first husband, Ann Phillimore (1729[11]-1791,buried at Frampton 7th May 1791[12]),daughter of John Phillimore[13], ofDursley[14], andhis wife Elizabeth[15].  Thecouple had three children – Elizabeth (1760[16]), Charlotte (1762[17]) andHenry (1763[18]) –before Nathaniel died in 1766.

The widowed Ann re-marriedat Frampton in 1772[19] EdwardSparkes, described as a ‘clerk’[20]. Later events show this to have been the Edward Sparkes who in 1774 became Vicarof Clodock.  Sparkes was the son of another Edward Sparkes, clerk, of Gloucester[21]. He was born in 1747[22] [23]and matriculated at Oxford (Merton College) on 6th June 1766 (aged18), receiving his BA in 1770[24].  AnEdward Sparks was married at Fretherne, a neighbouring parish to Frampton, in1742, so could have been born in about 1717[25].  Ifit is the same family, this could be the father.  The son’s date of death isrecorded as 30th November 1813, which would make him 66[26]. Edward and Ann had at least one daughter, Mary Ann Sparkes, who was baptised atFrampton 8th June 1773[27], whenAnn would have been about 44.

The family would have movedto Clodock on Sparkes’ appointment in 1774 and are next recorded when CharlotteWinchcombe of the parish married Henry Hicks there on 2nd November1784[28]. Hicks was a mill-owner in the Stroud area who made his home at Eastington[29][30],between Stroud and Frampton.  In marrying Charlotte, he was continuing atradition of inter-marriage among the clothing families of that district. Remote Clodock may well have been but it does not seem to have disruptedroots. 

Henry and Charlotte’schildren made medical history in about 1798 when Hicks allowed Dr Edward Jennerof Berkeley to vaccinate them[31].  Thiswas a coup for Jenner, who had begun his experiments on poorer people andclearly would have benefited from the endorsement of ‘persons of quality’.  Charlotte died in 1832[32] [33]or possibly 1837[34]. Henry died 16th June 1836[35] [36][37].

Although there had beensince 1753[38] arequirement to use a pre-printed marriage register, Clodock did not start touse one until August 1784 and Charlotte’s marriage is only the third entry inthe book.  It may be that the prospect of a prestigious marriage spurred Sparkesinto buying it.  However, he did not conduct the ceremony, leaving this to hiscurate, Thomas Jones.  The witnesses were Henry Beavan, clerk and Mary AnnSparkes.

Henry Beavan (1759[39]-1807[40])– the Rev. Henry Beavan – married Charlotte’s elder sister, ElizabethWinchcombe, the following year.  While Charlotte was married in Herefordshireto a Gloucestershire man, her sister achieved the reverse.  The wedding was atEastington on 29th March 1785[41],suggesting that she had already left the family home at Clodock to be with hersister and brother-in-law.  The groom was the son of Samuel Beavan, of Kingtonin Herefordshire.  (Newchurch[42],Tyn-y-Cwm[43] andWhitton[44], allRadnorshire, are also mentioned as the family home.)  These Beavans wererelated to the "wicked old Squire Beavan" mentioned by FrancisKilvert in his Diary of 1870-1879.  Henry was likely to be his uncle.[45]  Elizabeth died at Whitton in 1792[46]. Henry died in 1807.

The youngest of thestep-children, Henry Winchcombe, is the least well-documented.  He was baptisedat Frampton on 8th February 1763[47] and ismentioned in family Wills from 1767[48], 1768[49],1778[50], 1780[51]and 1824[52].  Hehad a son, also called Henry, who was born at Llanbadoc[53],Monm. in 1790[54] [55][56]and who founded a large dynasty of Winchcombes, several with Phillimore astheir middle name.  Henry (1790) gave the Census enumerator of 1851 theinformation that he was born at Llanbadoc but there is no record of his baptismthere, nor at Usk, the town whose west bank lies in Llanbadoc parish.  There isa letter from Henry Hicks to Nathaniel Winchcombe II, prior to the surnamechange of 1801, in which he fears that a relative, ‘H.W.’ – presumably Henry(1763) – will be thinking of returning to England if money is not sent[57].

The mother of Henry (1790)is unidentified.  Henry (1790) married Ann, the daughter of John and CatherineDavies, at Swansea, 25th July 1812[58]. Davies, another mill-owner, lived at Abergwili.  This Carmarthenshire villagecontains the former palace of the bishops of St Davids, in whose dioceseClodock was located until 1852[59].  AWinchcombe connection could have come about if Henry (1763) had accompaniedSparkes there on ecclesiastical business, married a local girl, and then moved,either temporarily or permanently, to Llanbadoc, while retaining the family’slinks with Abergwili.  This, however, is a theory that requires furtherinvestigation.

David Robins
1st August 2011

 


 

 



IGI = International Genealogical Index

[1] IGI

[2] Monumental inscription to Nathaniel Winchcombe, St.Mary’s Parish Church, Frampton-on-Severn

[4] IGI

[5] Monumental inscription to Nathaniel Winchcombe, St.Mary’s Parish Church, Frampton-on-Severn

[6] IGI

[7] Monumental inscription to Nathaniel Clifford, St.Mary’s Parish Church, Frampton-on-Severn

[8] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1952 edition

[9] IGI

[11] IGI

[12] Kurt Ganzl: 13 Sep 2009

[13] Pedigree at Frampton Court (viewed 8 Jul 2009)

[15] IGI

[16] IGI

[17] IGI

[18] IGI

[19] IGI

[20] Pedigree at Frampton Court (viewed 8 Jul 2009)

[21] Foster, Joseph (1888), Alumni Oxonienses: TheMembers of the University of Oxford 1715-1886, Parker & Co., Oxford

[22] Calculated from Foster, Joseph (1888), AlumniOxonienses: The Members of the University of Oxford 1715-1886, Parker &Co., Oxford

[23] IGI

[24] Foster, Joseph (1888), Alumni Oxonienses: TheMembers of the University of Oxford 1715-1886, Parker & Co., Oxford

[25] IGI

[26] Foster, Joseph (1888), Alumni Oxonienses: TheMembers of the University of Oxford 1715-1886, Parker & Co., Oxford

[27] IGI

[28] Marriage register (Herefordshire Record Office)

[33] Monumental inscription, St. Michael & All AngelsParish Church, Eastington

[34] BMD index at Ancestry.co.uk

[37] Monumental inscription, St. Michael & All AngelsParish Church, Eastington

[38] Hardwicke’s Marriage Act

[39] IGI

[41] IGI

[42] Foster, Joseph (1888), Alumni Oxonienses: TheMembers of the University of Oxford 1715-1886, Parker & Co., Oxford

[43] IGI

[46] Kurt Ganzl: 13 Sep 2009

[47] IGI

[50] Kurt Ganzl: 13 Sep 2009

[53] 1851 Census

[54] Calculation from 1851 Census

[55] Calculation from Cambrian Index Online: 29 Jul 1870

[56] Jill Collier: 17 Oct 2009

[57] Clifford papers (Gloucestershire Record Office,D149)

[58] Jean Day at Genes Reunited


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